It would be foolhardy to count on the conscience of the world. – Stefan Zweig

Portrait of Leonhard Euler (1707-1783). By Jakob Emanuel Handmann [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Leonhard Euler: Mathemtical Genius in the Enlightenment

Posted by on Nov 26, 2017 in Books
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From the first moment it all sounded very promising. A biography about a mathematical genius in the enlightenment period – thus checking off three of my favourite topics in just the book’s title already. With some caveats, I wasn’t disappointed. While not too well-known in popular culture, it is hard to overstate Euler’s accomplishments in …

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Kissinger: 1923-1968: The Idealist by Niall Ferguson

Posted by on Jul 9, 2017 in Books, Politics
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Henry Kissinger is one of the architects of our current political order. First sworn in as fifty-sixth secretary of state on September 22, 1973, he received the Nobel Peace Prize that same year, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and the Medal of Liberty in 1986. This was a world away from Fürth, Germany, where he was born in 1938 as Heinz Alfred Kissinger to an Orthodox Jewish school teacher. With the election of Donal Trump and rising nationalism across the world, we are looking into the next chapter, a new New World Order. As ever, it helps to understand the past to make predictions for the future, which is why I was looking forward to reading Dr. Kissinger’s new biography by Niall Ferguson.

Holocaust Remembrance Day

Posted by on Jan 31, 2017 in Politics
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This post came about in the light of Holocaust Remembrance Day and the Trump administration’s recent ban on immigration to the US for people of certain nationalities despite them holing valid US visa or green cards – which both fell on the same day past weekend. As the descendant of European refugees, many of whom died …

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Terracotta Warriors Group, Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California

‘Easternisation: War and Peace in the Asian Century’ by Gideon Rachman

Posted by on Jan 6, 2017 in Books, Politics
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This is a book I’ve been quite excited to read. I follow Gideon Rachman’s columns in the Financial Times and posts on Twitter regularly as he is one of the eminent foreign policy journalists today. Of course, he is also a Western journalist so even though he has travelled through most parts of the world and lived …

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